Study, Study, Break, Study

I’m sure we’re all familiar with study breaks- almost too familiar. Almost like we’re more familiar with study breaks than with the actual things we need to study haha (been there, done that)

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Nowadays, it’s easy to let a study break get away from us. 15 minutes on your phone can turn into 15 minutes of instagram, 15 minutes on facebook, 15 minutes of text messaging, 15 minutes of twitter… and next thing you know, you’ve been on your “study break” for an hour. Then you’re suddenly hungry so that’s another 15 minutes of making food and 15 minutes of eating said food, etc. Basically, more than ever, there are a lot of distractions around us.

But is there a purpose to study breaks when they’re only going to distract you? Answer: Yes. Which you all probably knew but let me tell you about it anyway.

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The point of a study break is to get the mind refreshed so that you can refocus on the task at hand when it’s time to get back into it. A good study break shouldn’t pause your brain entirely, it should be an activity that won’t require you to think too hard and will distract you from thinking about revision.

Use your time efficiently

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That thing I said above about 15 minutes for all forms of social media? Not a very good idea. Take short but fairly quick breaks and intersperse them within your study hours. Sprinkle them between lectures or topics that you know will be tough for your brain to process. Most importantly: Stick to the time allotted. No more, no less.

Eat good brain food

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Blueberries, peanuts, avocados, tomatoes, and pumpkin seeds are really good options, to name a few. If none of these are appealing to you, you can always do that thing parents love to do where they mix it in with your favourite food so you won’t mind it too much. I, personally, don’t like blueberries too much but if I put it in with a couple of strawberries and raspberries and they aren’t as bad.

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Instead of watching a TV Show or looking at social media, consider:

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  • Reading a book or an interesting article on current events
  • Doing a crossword puzzle
  • Cleaning some part of your room
  • Relaxing by listening to a calming playlist (I love listening to the rain whenever I need my brain to slow down.)
  • Reading some trivia
  • Exercise
    • This can help release endorphins, mood boosters, and brain stimulants that can help you throughout your long and gruelling study period.

Use your study time to its fullest capacity

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When you’re on your “study time” hours, stay focused and be present. Don’t stare into space or doodle around your notes. Use this time efficiently. Set goals for every block of time you’ve allocated. For example: one hour – learn this topic, 15 minute break, two hours set for answering questions about said topic you learned, etc.

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I also highly recommend flash cards. It’s always good to have something tangible that will challenge you on what you’ve learned and how much you’ve understood. One important standard I like to measure myself up to is: if I feel like I can’t teach it to someone else, that means I haven’t fully understood it myself.

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At the end of the day: different strokes for different folks. Study the way in which you learn best! Have a bearable SWOT VAC! I wish you the best of luck! May the odds of a good mark be ever in your favour!

 

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Veashka